Rosser Goes Fiercely After Jim Conley

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta GeorgianAugust 5th, 1913 The determined onslaught against Jim Conley, his string of affidavits and the story he told before the Frank jury had its real beginning Monday afternoon. Luther Rosser, starting with the avowed purpose of breaking down the negro’s story and forcing from the negro’s Continue Reading →

Jim Conley Tells An Amazing Story

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta JournalAugust 4th, 1913 MANY NEW AND SENSATIONAL FEATURES ADDED TO TALE AS ORIGINALLY GIVEN TO POLICE Conley Swears He Saw Mary Phagan Enter Factory, That He Heard Her Screams In the Metal Room a Short Time Later, That Frank Then Called Him and He Went Up Continue Reading →

Frank Calm and Jurors Tense While Jim Conley Tells His Gastcy [sic] Tale

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta GeorgianAugust 4th, 1913 During the long wait for Conley to appear, Frank, his loyal wife and his no less loyal mother gave no sign of fear. Accuser and accused were about to face each other, a dramatic situation which the authorities had sought to Continue Reading →

Jim Conley’s Story as Matter of Fact as if it Were of His Day’s Work

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta GeorgianAugust 4th, 1913 By O. B. Keeler. Jim Conley, hewer of wood and drawer of water. On the witness stand at the Frank trial this morning, Jim unfolded a tale whose lightest word—you know the rest. It was a story that flexed attention to Continue Reading →

“Break” in the Frank Trial May Come With the Hearing Of Jim Conley’s Testimony

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta ConstitutionAugust 3rd, 1913 By Britt Craig. Jim Conley isn’t a cornfield negro—he’s more of the present day type of city darkey—and that’s the only difference between him and Newt Lee. Outside of that there is but little variance. However, Jim’s ancestors hewd cotton and Continue Reading →

Will Not Indict Jim Conley Now, Jury’s Decision

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. The Atlanta Journal Monday, July 21, 1913 Solicitor Dorsey Makes Brief Announcement to This Effect After Grand Jury Session Lasting Over an Hour NO ANONYMOUS LETTERS WANTED BY THE JURORS Solicitor Dorsey Will Now Concentrate Efforts Against Having Frank Jury Drawing From Grand Jury List Continue Reading →

Jury Is Determined to Consider a Bill Against Jim Conley

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. The Atlanta Journal Saturday, July 19, 1913 Protest of Solicitor Fails to Stop Session to Consider Phagan Evidence on Monday DORSEY STILL BELIEVES JURY WON’T INDICT Solicitor Says Frank Defense Wants Jury to Try Him Drawn From the Grand Jury List Grand Jurors Who Will Continue Reading →

Dorsey Resists Move to Indict Jim Conley

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. The Atlanta Georgian Saturday, July 19, 1913 GRAND JURY SPLIT BY LATEST MOVE Public Opinion Forces Consideration of Move to Indict Conley for Phagan Slaying. Solicitor Dorsey is fighting vigorously the movement in the Grand Jury to indict Jim Conley Monday for the murder of Continue Reading →

Grand Jury Is Called Monday to Indict Jim Conley

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. The Atlanta Journal Friday, July 18, 1913 *Editor’s Note: Small sections of text are missing due to scanning near a crease. GRAND JURY CALLED TO TAKE UP MATTER OVER DORSEY’S HEAD Foreman W.D. Beattie Calls Body to Meet Monday and Take Up Evidence Against Negro Continue Reading →

State to Fight Move to Indict Jim Conley

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. The Atlanta Georgian Wednesday, July 16, 1913 Grand Jury Foreman Admits That Action Against the Negro Is Considered. The reported proposal by some of the members of the Grand Jury to meet for an investigation of Jim Conley’s connection with the murder of Mary Phagan Continue Reading →

Luther Z. Rosser Declares Detectives Dare Not Permit Jim Conley to Talk Freely

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. The Atlanta Journal Friday, June 13, 1913 “Conley and His Counsel Are Wise—Their Hope Is That the Detectives Will Save Negro From a Confession, Giving Him Immunity, Provided He Continues to Put Guilt on Frank” Several sensational points are contained in the written answer which Continue Reading →

Many Discrepancies To Be Bridged in Conley’s Stories

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta GeorgianAugust 5th, 1913 The defense of Leo Frank will bring out vividly before the jury Tuesday that the striking feature of Jim Conley’s dramatic recital on the stand Monday was that it differed not only from the first two affidavits signed by the negro, which he Continue Reading →

Conley’s Charge Turns Frank Trial Into Fight ‘To Worse Than Death’

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta GeorgianAugust 5th, 1913 By JAMES B. NEVIN. Black and sinister, depressing in its every aspect and horrible in its gloom, the testimony of Jim Conley in the Frank case was given to the court and the jury under direct examination Monday. The shadow of the negro Continue Reading →

Conley Thought He Was on Trial, His Attorney Declares

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta JournalAugust 4th, 1913 Jim thought he was on trial this morning,” said W. M. Smith, attorney for James Conley, the negro sweeper at the pencil factory, after the recess Monday noon following Conley’s appearance on the witness stand of the Frank trial. Attorney Smith declared that Continue Reading →

Conley’s Glibness May Prove Unfortunate for His Testimony

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta JournalAugust 4th, 1913 Negro’s Recitative Manner of Telling His Story Gives Impression That He Has Rehearsed It Many Times Jim Conley Monday morning recited his story to the Frank jury. Newt Lee last week told his. Above all other things, Jim’s testimony was glib. Continue Reading →

Conley’s Story In Detail; Women Barred By Judge

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta GeorgianAugust 4th, 1913 There was a murmur of excitement following the calling of Jim Conley; there was a wait of several minutes, officers having just left the police station with the negro a minute or two before he was called. Judge Roan impatiently ordered Continue Reading →